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Friday, 31 July 2009

She Moved Through The Fair...


Blogger ate my original posting... *** Where I talked about the history of this traditional folk song, about love and loss (Fhina's favourite themes, non?!) and all those who had recorded this lovely, sad and beautiful tunette...

(***Blogger est le vrai cannibal de nos jours, non?!)

This was posted by a dahlink on Youtube about the traditional folk song, She moved through the fair...

"I happened upon Anne Briggs via this song and 'Black Waterside', as guitarist Jimmy Page had adapted these songs and done guitar versions (White Summer and Black Mountain Side respectively), and was influenced by her and others such as Bert Jansch and Davey Graham. This song is like many of her songs, it is sung unaccompanied. Anne Briggs was 19 when she sang this at the Edinburgh Festival in 1963, where it was recorded and subsequently released on various albums.

The following is adapted from John Dougan of All Music Guide: Anne Briggs was a singer of traditional English folk music, possessing as beautiful a voice as one could hope to have. She was the single most important influence on a group of female British folk singers including Sandy Denny, Maddy Prior, June Tabor, and Linda Thompson. Even Norma Waterson, herself a hugely important figure in the British folk revival of the mid-'60s, admits to being influenced by Briggs' singing and notes that Anne Briggs singlehandedly changed the way that English women folk singers sang. What makes this story so odd is that Anne Briggs' entire recorded output consists of about 30 songs. She stopped singing at the age of 27, supposedly because she hated the sound of her recorded voice. As folk music became electrified and increasingly popular and bands such as Fairport Convention and Pentangle were reinventing the British folk tradition, and more and more women (Sandy Denny et al) were singing in a style started by Anne Briggs, her legend flourished, yet she still refused (and continues to refuse) to sing'.

And I make no excuse for 'pimping' my beloved nu-folkie, John William Smith here... Watch out for him, he's currently being looked after by David Gray's and Damien Rice's managers... Fingers crossed!



And I loved this song by Simple Minds, but never realised it was the same traditional tune, with different lyrics...

May you find such joy, love and peace in your lives, mes dahlinks... For I am off to bury the dead... Wish me love, wish me luck, wish me well...

7 comments:

jinksy said...

Magic ! This traditional folk song has haunted me from my teens onward. The melody even inspired me, once upn a time,to write some words of my own to fit with it. Thanks - I enjoyed the trip to yesteryear.

Alan Burnett said...

Thanks for the Anne Briggs clip - I thoroughly enjoyed it. The last time I heard her sing was on a record I owned back in the 1960s called "The Iron Muse". I must try and get a digital copy of it.

Moannie said...

Serenely beautiful.

Take care.

Derrick said...

Hello Fhina,

I had a work colleague who could sing this beautifully.

Hope today went "well".

French Fancy said...

I used to love Fairport. They were quite a bit older than me but the house they used to meet up in (called, of course, Fairport,) at Muswell Hill was just opposite my school and they were already well-known by then and the house was always pointed out to people.

As for 'Belfast Child' - that is one of Mr FF's favourite tracks and he usually plays it on his ipod at least once every few days

x

findingmywingsinlife said...

Lovely Fhina! Still a wonderful post in spite of bloggers cannabalism..I would have been fuming if blogger ate a post of mine.

Spellbound said...

Ah, the best posts are always the ones we lose, but I think this will do nicely. Breathtaking voice and words that I will listen to until they are etched in my memory Not sure how I missed her when I went through 1963. Likely I was self absorbed.

Something I wrote earlier...

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